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  • Five Nights At Freddy’s VR Coming To PSVR, Steam And Oculus In April
    fight nights at freddy's vr

    A VR version of Five Nights At Freddy’s is coming in April.

    The new game is called Five Nights At Freddy’s VR: Help Wanted and is in development from Steel Wool Studios. The game is coming in April to “PSVR, Oculus, Steam, and HTC Vive.” It is the first official VR title in the horror series.

    The short announce trailer certainly looks like it does justice to the horror series. On Oculus headsets, Face Your Fears functions as an intro-to-vr-horror title and it looks like Five Nights At Freddy’s could fill that role for PSVR headsets.

    For those unfamiliar, Freddy’s is a fictional pizza restaurant where the player works as a security guard. The creepy robot characters which inhabit the restaurant come to life at night and terrify the player. It is a favorite among kids and on phones, but in VR the series may have found a perfect fit. In VR it looks like you’ll go face-to-face with the terrifying creatures of the restaurant in an intimate way. The trailer shows some of the encounters players will have and they look pretty…alarming.

    Steel Wool Studios is the development team behind a number of VR projects including Quar Battle for Gate 18, Mars Odyssey and Ready Player One: Battle for the Oasis. Face Your Fears on Oculus headsets is an incredibly popular title so if Steel Wool is able to capture the same feeling on PSVR they could have a major hit on their hands. We’ll of course report back as soon as we are able to try out the game.

    Tagged with: Five Nights At Freddy's, PSVR

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  • SXSW VR Experience The Atomic Tree now Available on Within A short film on the life of a revered bonsai tree.
  • Palmer Luckey: ‘I Can’t Use The Oculus Rift S’

    The original founder of Oculus VR isn’t pleased with the Oculus Rift S IPD. Last week Oculus officially unveiled the Oculus Rift S, a ‘1.5 update’ to their popular Oculus Rift. Developed in collaboration with Lenovo, the PC VR headset features 1280×1440 per eye resolution, a higher pixel density, more efficient weight distribution, a single-cable

    The post Palmer Luckey: ‘I Can’t Use The Oculus Rift S’ appeared first on VRScout.

  • Beat Saber CEO Talks Hacks, Mods And Getting Artists Paid
    custom beat saber skins

    Beat Games CEO Jaroslav Beck speaks out on the topic of modding in Beat Saber and adding songs illegally into the game without licenses.

    The post Beat Saber CEO Talks Hacks, Mods And Getting Artists Paid appeared first on UploadVR.

  • Play Beach Volleyball and Mini Golf in AR With Krikey The Krikey app is available to download for free.
  • GDC 2019: Dead and Buried 2 Feels A Lot More Like Quake In VR Than Expected
    GDC 2019: Dead and Buried 2 Feels A Lot More Like Quake In VR Than Expected

    At GDC 2019 we went hands-on with Dead and Buried 2, an upcoming first-person shooter slated for both Oculus Rift and Oculus Quest.

    The post GDC 2019: Dead and Buried 2 Feels A Lot More Like Quake In VR Than Expected appeared first on UploadVR.

  • Oculus Rift S’s Muted Reveal Suggests Quest Is Facebook’s VR Front-Runner Now
    Oculus Rift S’s Muted Reveal Suggests Quest Is Facebook’s VR Front-Runner Now

    It would be fair to say we were all expecting a little magic. Rumors surrounding Facebook’s Oculus Rift S had been swirling for weeks; a refreshed headset with an improved display and inside-out tracking. And, to some extent, that’s what we got. But this week’s Rift S reveal was lacking the spark that made Facebook’s most recent headset unveilings so exciting.

    Rift S was announced with none of the regenerative enthusiasm or on-stage pizzazz that Facebook afforded Quest just six months ago. There was no Mark Zuckerberg and a crowd of hundreds to cheer it on. There wasn’t any of the technical wizardry of Quest nor a generously low price like that of Go. Instead, Rift S comes with, to use a term Facebook executives repeated ad nauseam in the past week, a set of ‘trade-offs’.

    Compromises Where There Weren’t Before

    The 90Hz dual-panel display, something Oculus once touted as a strict requirement for true immersion, has been traded in favor of an 80Hz single LCD panel. Design adds a comfort-improving halo ring, but ultimately makes the kit look a look more clunky than the first Rift’s slick form factor. It’s heavier, too, though apparently better balanced. The lack of mechanical IPD adjust, meanwhile, means that less people will be able to use Rift S comfortably. That’s a decision that’s drawn criticism from even Palmer Luckey himself.

    Most damningly, instead of lowering the price to $299 as we thought it might, Facebook kicked it back up to $399. That’s a more than fair price tag when you consider the large software library awaiting you, but it doesn’t generate the eclectic buzz Go’s $199 or even Quest’s all-in $399 costs do. All of that and Facebook’s allowed the Lenovo logo to be painted onto the side of the thing.

    Rift S is by no means a bad headset. Quite the opposite, in fact. But, for a device that should be making PC VR much more viable, it all feels remarkably, well, normal.

    Facebook’s Split Revealed?

    I think it’s right to wonder why Rift S isn’t just a cheaper Quest with its processing innards gutted. Moreover, why isn’t Quest fitted with a port to connect it to a PC and run PC VR itself? Questions like these bring to mind the confused reports of Facebook’s PC VR strategy that surfaced late last year. TechCrunch claimed former Oculus CEO Brendan Iribe had parted ways with the company after his vision of ‘Rift 2’ got scrapped in favor of this mid-generation refresh. Six months on, Oculus VP of Product Nate Mitchell tells us it partnered with Lenovo to bring Rift S to market with “speed”. It connects the dots just a little.

    Now, to be clear, I still plan on getting a Rift S. I rent a small London flat in which I have one clear objective: eliminate clutter. Getting rid of external sensors is a huge bonus for me. But, like UploadVR’s David Jagneaux said in his article earlier this week, all Rift S’s reveal really did was make me that much

    The post Oculus Rift S’s Muted Reveal Suggests Quest Is Facebook’s VR Front-Runner Now appeared first on UploadVR.

  • GDC 2019: Espire 1: VR Operative Is A Great Mix Of Action And Stealth
    espire 1 vr operative explosion

    Espire 1: VR Operative is shaping up to be the perfect mix of action and stealth that Metal Gear fans would love to experience in a headset.

    The post GDC 2019: Espire 1: VR Operative Is A Great Mix Of Action And Stealth appeared first on UploadVR.

  • Cartoon Network’s We Bare Bears: Food Truck Rush is now Going Global Bandai Namco will be bringing it to a wider audience.
  • John Carmack On PC Tethering For Quest: ‘No Promises But I Hope So’
    John Carmack On PC Tethering For Quest: ‘No Promises But I Hope So’

    Oculus Quest is due to launch in a matter of months but John Carmack is still hoping we’ll see one major addition to the device.

    Carmack was again asked about the possibility of tethering Facebook’s newest standalone headset to a PC on Twitter over the weekend. He simply replied: “Sorry, no promises, but I hope so!”

    Sorry, no promises, but I hope so!

    — John Carmack (@ID_AA_Carmack) March 24, 2019

    Given that Carmack is Chief Technology Officer at Oculus and has been working on fine-tuning Quest, this gives us hope. Quest is an all-in-one device that features everything needed to play games like Superhot onboard. It’s got a six degrees of freedom (6DOF) inside-out tracking system that enables you to move as you would in Rift too. In theory, if you could plug a Quest into a PC, you could play PC VR content too.

    Back in October 2018 Carmack revealed that Oculus did discuss a PC VR mode for Quest. At the time he said the company is looking into “maxing out WiFi streaming” on the device but, again, couldn’t make any promises that it would happen.

    But there’s one thing standing in the way of that possibility: Oculus Rift S. Facebook’s newly-announced PC VR headset already integrates some of the features of Quest like inside-out tracking. Adding PC VR support to Quest would leave Rift S struggling with a reason to exist. Oculus would surely be cannibalizing the sales of Rift S in that case.

    Perhaps it’s an option for the future, then. The idea of plugging Quest into a PC to play a high-fidelity game like Lone Echo and then unplugging it and taking it to a friend’s house to play Beat Saber is an exciting one.

    Oculus Quest launches this spring for $399.

    Tagged with: john carmack, Oculus Quest

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    The post John Carmack On PC Tethering For Quest: ‘No Promises But I Hope So’ appeared first on UploadVR.

  • “I Can’t use Rift S” and Neither can 30% of the Population States Palmer Luckey The new headset's IPD adjustment is a bit controversial.
  • I’m Fine is a VR Suicide Awareness Experience Coming From VoidVR It's due out later this year for HTC Vive and Oculus Rift.
  • Palmer Luckey: ‘I Can’t Use Oculus Rift S’ Due To IPD Changes
    Palmer Luckey: ‘I Can’t Use Oculus Rift S’ Due To IPD Changes

    What does the inventor of the Oculus Rift think about its newest model, Oculus Rift S?

    Well, he says can’t use it.

    In a blog posted this weekend, Palmer Luckey, who left Oculus in 2017, spoke out about the new device. He reasoned that a lot of the new features being put into the kit were good ones. Rift S switches out the original Rift’s external sensor-based tracking system for an inside-out solution, for example. But, ultimately, Luckey’s post is concerned with one major change: the loss of mechanical IPD adjustment.

    IPD adjust allows users to tweak the position of a headset’s optics to better suit their eyes. IPD specifically refers to the distance between a user’s eyes, and different sizes have different requirements for comfortable VR. In Rift S, Oculus is switching out the slider on the bottom of the original Rift for a software-based solution. When we spoke to Oculus about the change at GDC last week the company admitted this solution wouldn’t be perfect for everyone. It appears Luckey is one of those people.

    The Rift inventor says that his IPD is just under 70mm and “slightly skewed to the right side”. On the original Rift, which was designed to be compatible with the “5th to 95th percentile” of people, this wasn’t a problem. But Luckey says it will be on the Oculus Rift S, which features the same optics and IPD solution as Oculus Go. Luckey also says he can’t use that headset.

    Cinderella’s Shoe

    “Everyone who fits Cinderella’s shoe will get a perfect experience, anyone close will deal with minor eyestrain problems that impact their perception of VR at a mostly subconscious level,” Luckey wrote. “Everyone else is screwed, including me.”

    So what would Luckey have preferred? He presented several possible alternatives but his favorite was offering different versions of Rift S tailored for different IPD sizes. “Rift S should have done this,” he said. “The logistical overhead of managing a handful of different SKUs with slightly different plastic pieces holding the lenses at slightly different distances would have allowed Rift S to keep costs low and expand the addressable market for VR without cutting out new and old customers alike.”

    But, perhaps more importantly, Luckey expressed frustration with the lack of alternatives Rift S presented. Indeed, Rift S is fully replacing the original Rift so anyone with an incompatible IPD will be, in Luckey’s words, “locked out” of the Oculus ecosystem in the future. The original Rift is now largely sold out online. If you do own a Rift already, though, Oculus says it will be supported for the foreseeable future.

    “I spent much of my later tenure at Oculus working on supporting headsets from other vendors, in part to avoid this type of situation,” Luckey wrote. “As things stand, I find myself shunned by an ecosystem I spent most of my adult life helping to create.”

    Rift S launches this spring for $399. Will you be picking up the handset or are IPD concerns holding you back?

    Tagged with: oculus rift s, palmer luckey

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    The post Palmer Luckey: ‘I Can’t Use Oculus Rift S’ Due To IPD Changes appeared first on UploadVR.

  • Learn About Food Pairing Through The Angry Orchard AR App

    Angry Orchard wants you to use AR to determine which food goes best with their ciders. When it comes to pairing food with alcoholic beverage, most people think about the intricacies of wines, bourbons, and even beers, and how those distinctive flavors can mingle with foods to augment how they jolt your pallet. But what

    The post Learn About Food Pairing Through The Angry Orchard AR App appeared first on VRScout.

  • The VR Job Hub: WarDucks, Oculus and Facebook Reality Labs If it's a job you're after, then you've come to the right place.