IDG Contributor Network: 5 practical ways AR can be used in business today

Augmented reality (or AR) is an increasingly hot topic at the moment, thanks to the rapid pace of new technologies and the fact that we all carry AR-ready devices around in the form of our smartphones. There was a time when AR software was sluggish, unintuitive and quite frankly ugly to look at. People didn’t use it because they didn’t like it.

But those days are over, as is evidenced by the exciting new technologies that are popping up all over the world. Google’s new Pixel Buds allow users to translate into different languages on the fly just like the Babel fish in Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Pokémon Go had more first week downloads from the Apple App Store than any other app in history and still has 65 million monthly active users.

To read this article in full, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: 5 practical ways AR can be used in business today

Augmented reality (or AR) is an increasingly hot topic at the moment, thanks to the rapid pace of new technologies and the fact that we all carry AR-ready devices around in the form of our smartphones. There was a time when AR software was sluggish, unintuitive and quite frankly ugly to look at. People didn’t use it because they didn’t like it.

But those days are over, as is evidenced by the exciting new technologies that are popping up all over the world. Google’s new Pixel Buds allow users to translate into different languages on the fly just like the Babel fish in Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Pokémon Go had more first week downloads from the Apple App Store than any other app in history and still has 65 million monthly active users.

To read this article in full, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: 5 practical ways AR can be used in business today

Augmented reality (or AR) is an increasingly hot topic at the moment, thanks to the rapid pace of new technologies and the fact that we all carry AR-ready devices around in the form of our smartphones. There was a time when AR software was sluggish, unintuitive and quite frankly ugly to look at. People didn’t use it because they didn’t like it.

But those days are over, as is evidenced by the exciting new technologies that are popping up all over the world. Google’s new Pixel Buds allow users to translate into different languages on the fly just like the Babel fish in Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Pokémon Go had more first week downloads from the Apple App Store than any other app in history and still has 65 million monthly active users.

To read this article in full, please click here

2018 looks bright for immersive technology

Think virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) and you probably think gaming. But there’s also a whole host of business applications. We spoke to some of the leading industry experts to get their views on which industries will be most disrupted by AR and VR in 2018; two key areas are the internet of things and cybersecurity – you can find out why below. We’ve also included more in-depth trends from leading experts, Tony Parisi, global head of VR/AR Strategy at Unity Technologies, and Martin Harriman, chairman at WaveOptics.

AR for IoT

AR is much more promising than VR especially in industrial situations and at 451 Research we often point out that AR is the user interface for the internet of things (IoT): Take a large industrial appliance, manufacturing plant or oil refinery which is instrumented and collecting and analysing data. This IoT-enabled environment creates a digital twin, a data model of the current state of the system and its processes. For an onsite engineer called to replace a part, as part of preemptive maintenance from IoT analytics, having a view of all the data and status of a machine from the inside out is now possible. A way to present that is as an AR style overlay, which can be presented hands-free to the engineer via adaptations to the safety goggles they are already wearing. With hands free and with information directly available the engineer can operate more efficiently, and in addition call remote support for another expert to assist and annotate the engineer’s view. Data is gathered to help tune the machines and processes and workers need access to that, presenting a perfect AR use case.

To read this article in full, please click here

(Insider Story)

2018 looks bright for immersive technology

Think virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) and you probably think gaming. But there’s also a whole host of business applications. We spoke to some of the leading industry experts to get their views on which industries will be most disrupted by AR and VR in 2018; two key areas are the internet of things and cybersecurity – you can find out why below. We’ve also included more in-depth trends from leading experts, Tony Parisi, global head of VR/AR Strategy at Unity Technologies, and Martin Harriman, chairman at WaveOptics.

To read this article in full, please click here